Square modular boxes with decorations, by Tomoko Fusè

These gorgeous boxes can be found in a japanese book, ISBN 9784416307069, page 66 and further. They’re all the same base model, only the decoration part changes.

As you can see, I really like this model, and folded a huge serie of them. On the left, folded from japanese washi chiyogami (this one) (two 15 cm sheets on the bottom + a matching 7.5 cm for the decoration) and one sheet of gold foil paper 15 cm for the lid. On the right, yellow Tant paper (2 sheets on bottom + 1 under the crane) and another japanese washi chiyogami, one sheet 15 cm for the lid and another for the crane (not sure about the size).

Here you can see I played nesting boxes with different decorations. People loved opening them and discovering the next! The crane with wide tail is on page 63.

The paper is from a nuinui pack, 20, 18 and 15 cm (double-sided, the cream color is the other side). It’s great to have the same pattern in different sizes, for the nesting :)

The left box is double-sided chiyogami 15 cm from toyo (a pack of 30 patterns, 120 sheets). I love the little leaves.

The paper for the box on the right comes from a nuinui pack again. It’s not so clear on the picture, but the decoration is actually a handle on this one.

Totoro by Robin Glynn, leaves by Jeremy Shafer

Jo Nakashima made a video tutorial for this adorable Totoro by Robin Glynn. My brother and his girlfriend like Totoro a lot, so I made one for them… and then her sister asked for it when she visited, so I had to make them another one – let’s say, if you have Miyazaki enthousiasts around you, you can fold this model a few times :) It’s not excessively complicated, but looks really good.

Totoro is folded from one sheet of 25cm grey kami ; The leaf, as said before, is one square sheet of 20cm paper. Jeremy Shafer made a video tutorial.

Here you see the back of the leaf.

Modular by Tomoko Fusè

This modular origami by Tomoko Fusè can be found in “Origami modulaires d’exception” (nuinui, ISBN 9782889355815, page 106).

It is folded from 6 sheets of 15cm kraft paper from Daiso. I like the double-sided effect, but it’s pretty with one-sided paper too.

3 modules are folded and assembled, then 3 more are made in mirror direction, then all are put together. You can also make a pyramid using only 3 modules.

The small one is made with 7.5 cm paper “Dot mini origami – star” by Showa Grimm.

Heart box by PaperKawaï

Paperkawaii published the video tutorial for this box a while ago. She has other cute models, but isn’t afraid of cutting and gluing – not my thing. This model is pure origami though. Beware, the music she puts on the videos is really irritating, but you can just shut it off, since she doesn’t talk.

It is folded from 2 sheets of 20cm paper (from a nuinui kit).

It is really sturdy, closes and opens well. I’ll probably fold it again :)

Falcon by Luca Vitagliano

This elegant falcon by Luca Vitagliano can be found in “Origami – la touche italienne”, ISBN 9782889355495, page 114 (it exists in other languages too, nuinui is an multi-languages editing house).

It is folded from one sheet of 24 cm kami.

I really like that it holds well on something (here a vase). It’s not too hard to fold, and it has some details that make it recognizable as a falcon.

This was my first attempt to fold it, but I’ll probably fold it again with different papers.

Boxes with hold on the lid, by Tomoko Fusè

I really, really like this book by Tomoko Fusè. As far as I know, it hasn’t been translated. The ISBN is 9784416307052. Square boxes page 84, rectangular page 88.

The box on the left is folded from 2 sheets of “back to basics” paper by Dovecraft, theme “baby steps”, 20cm (the paper is 150 gsm cardstock, thin enough to fold but makes strong boxes!). The middle is chiyogami 14cm, the rightmost is “Die Sachenmacher” 20cm. Step 6 of the box, I recommend leaving a 1-2 mm gap to make step 19 easier and cleaner.

The box on the left is folded from the same Dovecraft paper as the one on the above photo. The one on the right is japanese yuzen chiyogami 15cm.

Leaves by Jeremy Schaeffer, gorilla by Lionel Albertino

The cute gorilla is by Lionel Albertino, you can find it in “Safari Origami”, ISBN 2844240062. You can download the book because the author re-published it for free, thanks to him! It’s in French, but folding conventions are international :)The book has plenty of other models.

It’s folded from one sheet of square 20cm paper. I really like the mouth :)

The leaves are by Jeremy Shafer. They’re folded from one square sheet of 20cm paper. Here’s the video tutorial.

Traditional tato

I really like these traditional japanese tato. The word Tato is used to describe envelopes, or flat containers, that are folded symetrically. Some of them are square, but most of those I’ve seen are octogonal – and they are my favorite, too :) This specific model can be found in Calming Origami (ISBN 9781488908088), but there are many, many variations (more in a later post). The book is not very interesting, there are only 10 traditional models, but I have no other diagram for this specific tato, and the papers to cut out are gorgeous.

Each tato is folded from one sheet of square paper, but the corners are folded in – you can also cut an octogon. The gorgeous gold/red paper is 24cm Toyo paper. The small flower is 7.5 cm double-sided Toyo paper.

The patterned / purple paper is 21cm, from the giant nuinui kit.

The left tato is made from 20cm double-sided paper by “Die Sachenmacher”, in a package of 120 sheets. The right-hand one is 35cm Tant paper, and the tiny crane is 7.5 cm Tant paper :)

All of those papers are available from origamishop, except the Sachenmacher, that I got from Amazon.

It’s a beautiful envelope for a little note to loved ones, and it’s magical how it wants to go back in place once opened, because of the paper memory.

Two modulars by Tomoko Fusè

These models are both by Tomoko Fusè. The star on the left can be found in “Origami you can play with” (japanese), ISBN 4416300123, page 50. The pyramid (“modular ditetrahedron”) is in “Origami from around the world” by Vicente Palacios, ISBN 978048422220, page 74.

The pyramid is folded of 6 sheets of 15 cm kraft paper from schoenepapiere.de (the website is down, not sure if the shop will ever open again).

The star is folded of 6 sheets of 5 cm pearl paper from Jong le Nara + 6 sheets of 2,5 cm (I cut two sheets in 4) for the black points.