Traditional tato

I really like these traditional japanese tato. The word Tato is used to describe envelopes, or flat containers, that are folded symetrically. Some of them are square, but most of those I’ve seen are octogonal – and they are my favorite, too :) This specific model can be found in Calming Origami (ISBN 9781488908088), but there are many, many variations (more in a later post). The book is not very interesting, there are only 10 traditional models, but I have no other diagram for this specific tato, and the papers to cut out are gorgeous.

Each tato is folded from one sheet of square paper, but the corners are folded in – you can also cut an octogon. The gorgeous gold/red paper is 24cm Toyo paper. The small flower is 7.5 cm double-sided Toyo paper.

The patterned / purple paper is 21cm, from the giant nuinui kit.

The left tato is made from 20cm double-sided paper by “Die Sachenmacher”, in a package of 120 sheets. The right-hand one is 35cm Tant paper, and the tiny crane is 7.5 cm Tant paper :)

All of those papers are available from origamishop, except the Sachenmacher, that I got from Amazon.

It’s a beautiful envelope for a little note to loved ones, and it’s magical how it wants to go back in place once opened, because of the paper memory.

Two modulars by Tomoko Fusè

These models are both by Tomoko Fusè. The star on the left can be found in “Origami you can play with” (japanese), ISBN 4416300123, page 50. The pyramid (“modular ditetrahedron”) is in “Origami from around the world” by Vicente Palacios, ISBN 978048422220, page 74.

The pyramid is folded of 6 sheets of 15 cm kraft paper from schoenepapiere.de (the website is down, not sure if the shop will ever open again).

The star is folded of 6 sheets of 5 cm pearl paper from Jong le Nara + 6 sheets of 2,5 cm (I cut two sheets in 4) for the black points.

Dragon by Edwin Corrie

These cute dragons by Edwin Corrie can be found in “Origami Animals” (ISBN 9780486478746), by Vicente Palacios, page 34.

Each of them is folded from one square sheet of paper, 15cm and 20cm depending on the model. I also folded it from 30cm scrapbooking paper and it looked good, but I gave those away :)

Step 8 of the diagram is wrong, there’s one fold on the right that is marked valley and is in fact a mountain. I also added the small fold on the wings tips, to give them some volume. Otherwise, the model is quite easy to follow – and if you have children around you, beware that you’ll have to fold one for each of them!

Pop-up envelope by Tomoko Fusè

This funny envelope is found in Home Decorating With Origami, Japan Publications (ISBN 4889960597), page 34.

The model in the book is square when closed, I added a few folds to make it a cuter geometric form. Plenty of other variations are possible!

It is folded from one sheet of A4 printer paper. Opening the envelope is really satisfying, it resists then suddently bursts open in your hands!

This is a gif, if you click you’ll see the opening sequence :)

Rotating Tetrahedron by Tomoko Fusè

This funny model is by Tomoko Fusè. It can be found in “Origami for the connoisseur”, by Kunihiro Kasahara and Toshie Takahama, ISBN 4817090022.

Each is folded from 3 sheets of 15 cm paper (kami on the left, kami+print chiyogami by Grimmhobby on the right). As always with Tomoko Fusè, it’s really sturdy once assembled.

You can make the model rotate around its center! It’s really funny to play with, amuses children and geeks alike :)

Elephants by Fumiaki Kawahata and Edwin Corrie

So… a year ago, I blogged about Nick Robinson’s elephants. As I said before, I don’t fold many animals, but there are a few exceptions: I like birds, bats, cats, dragons, and butterflies. And elephants, obviously. So, more elephants!

This cute guy is by Fumiaki Kawahata. Leyla Torres made a video tutorial. I’m not sure about the paper, maybe the 20cm from Avenue Mandarine?

I think the elephant on the right is the one by Edwin Corrie, found in “Origami Animals” by Vicente Palacios (ISBN 9780486478746), page 40 – he has a few diagrams on his website, check it out :)

Both models are intermediate. Step 11 of Corrie’s elephant is a bit tricky, but not undoable.

Pleated decoration by Tomoko Fusè

This very pretty model by Tomoko Fusè can be found in “Origami modulaires d’exception”, ISBN 9782889355815 (nuinui editions), page 42.

It is folded from six 15X7.5 cm sheets. The red ones are washi chiyogami by Grimmhobby, the white ones are very plain paper, but I thought it made the patterned ones stand out more.

You can add more modules if you feel like it, and make it more fluffly.

This book has plenty of cute models, in the easy or intermediate range. For non-Frensh speakers, I’m pretty sure the books by nuinui editions are translated, at least in Italian, maybe English? As usual, the instructions are clear and photos gorgeous (personnaly, I’d prefer a bit less photos and more models, but I guess I’m not the main audience intended).

Star

This star can be found in a Toyo small book in japanese, no idea what the title means, but ISBN 4902031010071, page 115. Again, no idea who the author is, if someone speaking japanese can tell me, I’ll update :)

The star is folded from 16 sheets of 7 cm kami paper.

Pipe by Edward Megrath, cube by Tomoko Fusè

Those two very different models can be found in “Origami” by Paulo Mulathino, ISBN 0785802622 (Chartwell books inc).It is a book full of simple but cute designs.

Cube folded from 6 sheets of 7 cm Senbazuru chiyogami (Grimmhobby). Pipe folded from 20 cm Heyda paper.

It may not be very visible from the photo, but the pipe (page 26) is actually 3-D and really realistic.

I saw the cube model (page 72) and immediately wanted to fold it ; halfway through, I checked the author, and was not surprised to see it was Tomoko Fusè.  This is a very simple and elegant model, as always :)