Dragon by Edwin Corrie

These cute dragons by Edwin Corrie can be found in “Origami Animals” (ISBN 9780486478746), by Vicente Palacios, page 34.

Each of them is folded from one square sheet of paper, 15cm and 20cm depending on the model. I also folded it from 30cm scrapbooking paper and it looked good, but I gave those away :)

Step 8 of the diagram is wrong, there’s one fold on the right that is marked valley and is in fact a mountain. I also added the small fold on the wings tips, to give them some volume. Otherwise, the model is quite easy to follow – and if you have children around you, beware that you’ll have to fold one for each of them!

Pop-up envelope by Tomoko Fusè

This funny envelope is found in Home Decorating With Origami, Japan Publications (ISBN 4889960597), page 34.

The model in the book is square when closed, I added a few folds to make it a cuter geometric form. Plenty of other variations are possible!

It is folded from one sheet of A4 printer paper. Opening the envelope is really satisfying, it resists then suddently bursts open in your hands!

This is a gif, if you click you’ll see the opening sequence :)

Sonobe variation, by Kalami

Kalami (Christine Pape? or Blasek?) published this Sonobe variation. You can find it in the Christmas Origami Book 2009 (as well as many, many other diagrams and crease patterns! Enjoy :)) or on her website (some other diagrams too, all very precise, beautiful and clear).

It doesn’t seem to have a specific name, but I always refer to it in my head as the “razor kusudama”, because the flaps that go up between the montains look so sharp.

It is folded from 30 sheets of 7.5 cm paper “black and white” from Aitoh. I used 5 different patterns, there are 16 in the pack – I think they make most models look classy, I love it.

Rotating Tetrahedron by Tomoko Fusè

This funny model is by Tomoko Fusè. It can be found in “Origami for the connoisseur”, by Kunihiro Kasahara and Toshie Takahama, ISBN 4817090022.

Each is folded from 3 sheets of 15 cm paper (kami on the left, kami+print chiyogami by Grimmhobby on the right). As always with Tomoko Fusè, it’s really sturdy once assembled.

You can make the model rotate around its center! It’s really funny to play with, amuses children and geeks alike :)

Elephants by Fumiaki Kawahata and Edwin Corrie

So… a year ago, I blogged about Nick Robinson’s elephants. As I said before, I don’t fold many animals, but there are a few exceptions: I like birds, bats, cats, dragons, and butterflies. And elephants, obviously. So, more elephants!

This cute guy is by Fumiaki Kawahata. Leyla Torres made a video tutorial. I’m not sure about the paper, maybe the 20cm from Avenue Mandarine?

I think the elephant on the right is the one by Edwin Corrie, found in “Origami Animals” by Vicente Palacios (ISBN 9780486478746), page 40 – he has a few diagrams on his website, check it out :)

Both models are intermediate. Step 11 of Corrie’s elephant is a bit tricky, but not undoable.

Pleated decoration by Tomoko Fusè

This very pretty model by Tomoko Fusè can be found in “Origami modulaires d’exception”, ISBN 9782889355815 (nuinui editions), page 42.

It is folded from six 15X7.5 cm sheets. The red ones are washi chiyogami by Grimmhobby, the white ones are very plain paper, but I thought it made the patterned ones stand out more.

You can add more modules if you feel like it, and make it more fluffly.

This book has plenty of cute models, in the easy or intermediate range. For non-Frensh speakers, I’m pretty sure the books by nuinui editions are translated, at least in Italian, maybe English? As usual, the instructions are clear and photos gorgeous (personnaly, I’d prefer a bit less photos and more models, but I guess I’m not the main audience intended).

Star by Yamaguchi Makoto

This star can be found in a Toyo small book in japanese, no idea what the title means, but ISBN 4902031010071, page 115. Again, no idea who the author is, if someone speaking japanese can tell me, I’ll update :)*

The star is folded from 16 sheets of 7 cm kami paper.

*Edit: once again, Michel Grand helped with identification of the author! As we can see on Origami House’website, it’s Yamaguchi Makoto, and the book is “Kirei na Origami”
(Beautiful Origami), number 6.

Folding enlightenment

One of the reasons I love origami is that I love paper. I always did. I enjoy admiring the patterns, and I love the texture of different papers in my fingers. When I find new papers to fold, it generally doesn’t go well at first – I love when my fingers suddently understand the precise resistence and strength of the paper, when I adapt the folds to allow for the exact thickness of the paper ; when the perfect model to let the designs be admired pops to my mind.

Origami is full of enlightenments. Concrete, material, my-hands-have-grasped-this revelations. I generally have a hard time getting my brain to be quiet for a while, and folding origami is a perfect way to reach that. There’s no point in over-thinking it, you have to fold to understand.

But then, there is fun to be had for my brain as well. Learning cryptic and often confusing japanese names for the different kinds of paper ; searching for good origami models, reading about amazing origami artists, and sometimes pour this new knowledge in their wikipedia pages in the process ;)

One might even find spiritual, philosophical enlightenments. It does teach patience and it’s sometimes a form of meditation, relaxation or such. It’s also an art of the ephemeral: creations of paper are to be enjoyed while they last, but you know the colors will fade, or children hands will get to them, or your previously most beloved creations will seem dull, clumsy once you’ve learned new models, once your hands become more agile. And that’s not an issue, that’s the whole beauty of it: I love to give my origamis when people ask for them, it makes place for new ones, it’s a constant reminder of impermanence.

Demon by Kawai Toyoaki (?)

This laughing demon is in the leaflet provided with 35cm kami paper. I can’t read japanese, so I have no idea who the author is. If someone reads japanese, has the paper and can tell me, I’ll update :)*

I folded it not from the paper it is sold with, but from double-sided kami paper 35 cm, to have the mouth red and colored face. The finished model is around 20 cm high.

I really like his joyful smile, and the eyes are very expressive too. It’s also relatively easy to fold.

*Edit: As always, Michel Grand is an attribution detective (he should get a free subscribtion to Origami Tanteidan ;)). So, we’re not absolutely sure, but this demon looks really similar to this model by Kawai Toyoaki. It might be a variation by someone else, though, as I don’t recognize the ideograms for her name on the model.

Cat box by Tomoko Fusè

This cute cat box (or shell) by Tomoko Fusè can be found in a book in japanese, ISBN 4480872035, page 22.

The box is folded of one sheet of A4 paper (the same I used on this box).

It’s cute and elegant at the same time :)

 

Edit: correct ISBN (thanks Michel Grand!). By the way, on Gilad’s page you can see all models in the book (as you can see, the book uses paper in A format – but some work with other rectangles, too).